Archives For olympic weightlifting

Last week we tapered a bit, rested a bit.  The guys going to a local competition did mostly lifts but low volume, the guys not going to a meet did a variety of odd stuff. We all trained.

This week will go as follows…  It will be a hard week…

Monday

AM

Snatch 8 doubles with a pause at the knee

clean and jerk  8 doubles with a pause at the knee

various heavy lower back work

PM

Snatch singles 8 singles with a pause at the knee

clean and jerk 8 singles with a pause at the knee

vertical exercise 5 sets of 10

Tuesday

8 sets of the following.  weight in rack, front squat it twice, jerk it, drop it, take 20 kilos off, power clean it and put it back in the rack.

muscle snatch, 5 sets of 10

Wednesday

AM

2 high pulls + one snatch, 8 sets

2 pulls + one clean and jerk

various lower back and posterior chain work

PM

8 snatches

8 clean and jerks

Squat 4 sets of 8

Thursday

max on power snatch

max on power clean

Friday

AM

Snatch light

Clean and jerk light

PM

Snatch light for a few doubles

Clean and jerk light for a few doubles

Saturday

Snatch lto max, then 3 or 4 doubles with 10kg less

clean and j erk to max, then 3 or 4 doubles with 20kg less

squat 4 sets of 8

Monday

AM

Snatch several doubles at about 75%

clean and jerk to near maximum

Reverse hypers

PM

Snatch to near maximum

clean and jerk several doubles at about 75%

Back raises

Tuesday

Power snatch to max, then two doubles with about 15kg less

power clean and jerk to max.  then two doubles with about 15kg less

Some upper back and shoulder exercise.

Wednesday

AM

Snatch several doubles up to as high a weight as possible

clean and jerk to about 75%

reverse hypers

PM

snatch to about 75%

clean and jerk several doubles up to as high a weight as possible

Back squat 4 sets of 8

Back raises

Thursday

Power snatch to max

Power clean to max

Some shoulder and upper back strength movement

Friday

AM

Snatch light

clean and jerk light

Reverse hypers

PM

Max snatch

max clean and jerk

Saturday

squat, 4 sets of 8

light snatch

light clean and jerk

Back raises Continue Reading…

Monday

AM

Snatch to about 90%

clean pulls to max clean

Muscle snatch 5 sets of 5

PM

Snatch high pull doubles up to max snatch

clean and jerk to about 90%

Tuesday

powersnatch to max

powerclean to max

Wednesday

AM

Snatch to about 90%

Clean pulls to max clean

vertical lift 3 sets of 10

PM

Snatch pulls to max snatch

Clean and jerk to about 90%

squat 4 sets of 8

Thurday

Powersnatch to about 90%

Powerclean to about 90%

Friday

AM

Muscle snatch 5 ets of 5

Clean and push press fairly light

PM

Snatch to max

clean and jerk to max

Saturday

Snatch pulls to max snatch

Clean pulls to max clean

Squats 4 sets of 8

Taylor Rooper has just started lifting for California Strength under Glenn Pendlay and the elite team members

Andrew Jester as well.

Great job guys!!

Jon North describes his recent push onto the National Stage in less than one year training with the elite team at California Strength under Glenn Pendlay and David Spitz

Just wanted to congratulate Jon North on totaling 332, the highest total in the country in the 94kg weight class this year, at the Redwood Empire Championships today.  He went 155/177, missing the jerk after a good clean with 185.

Monday

AM

2 Snatch high pulls + 1 hang snatch.  8-10 sets with roughly 75-80%

clean and jerk 5 singles with 75-80%

back raises

PM

Snatch 5 singles with 85-90%

2 clean pulls + clean + jerk   6-8 sets with 75-80%

Muscle snatch 5 sets of 5, light

Tuesday

power clean + 2 front squats + jerk    8-10 sets with about 90% of best power clean

vertical exercise, 3 sets

Wednesday

AM

snatch, 3 doubles at about 80%

clean and jerk, 8-10 doubles with a pause off the floor each clean.  75-80%

Back raises

PM

snatch, 8 to 10 doubles with pause at knee, roughly 75-80%

clean and jerk, 3 doubles at about 80%

Back squat, 4 sets of 8

Thursday

2 snatches + 2 overhead squats     8-10 sets, around 75-80%

Muscle snatch, 5 sets of 5, light

Friday

AM

snatch 6 singles with a pause at knee.  Heavy as possible

clean and jerk 3 doubles with 70%

back raises

PM

snatch 3 doubles at 70%

clean and jerk, 6 singles with pause at knee, as heavy as possible.

Saturday

2 snatch + 1 snatch, 8-10 doubles with 75-80%

Back squat 4 sets of 8

A DISCUSSION ON WARMING-UP

Donny —  July 2, 2010 — 4 Comments

By Donny Shankle CPT

Explain why warming-up makes you feel good?

There are three areas to be discussed in response to that question. Considering there is much speculation behind the importance of the warm-up, I will elaborate on the third area which I find to be the most important. The following list is taken from the national academy of sport’s medicine.

1.There is an increase in the heart and respiratory rate.

Increases the cardio-respiratory system’s capacity to perform work.

Increases blood flow to active muscle tissue.

Increases the oxygen intake capacity.

2.There is an increase in tissue temperature.

Increases the rate of muscular contraction.

Increases the efficiency of opposing muscle contraction and relaxation.

Increases metabolic rate.

Increases the soft tissue extensibility.

3. Increases psychological readiness.

Are general or specific warm-ups for the body even necessary?

No, all demands placed on the body are secondary only to that same demand placed on the mind. If trauma has been suffered on an area of the body, a certain amount of massage, myo-fascial release and medicine’s may be necessary to perform. A conditioned weightlifter can place their body under immediate stress without a general or specific warm-up. Both general and specific warm-ups are unnecessary to training and only deter from your ability to perform better.

How does a weightlifter prepare for increased demand?

Aside from being physically ready (which takes years of training) your mind not your brain must have an underlying motivation to help you achieve your goals fearlessly. You cannot expect to move above present accomplishments without first commanding yourself to achieve more. In weightlifting this means simply putting more weight on the bar and trying many times to be successful with it. If your after increasing the performance in your training you must first learn to viciously move out of comfort zones. This process can be painful or slow at times but embrace these challenges and you will become stronger.

How is the brain different from the mind?

The brain is solely a reaction organ. All action required of the brain is spontaneous and quick when trained to do so. Move your finger from a hot stove or get down when you here gunfire. These actions come without thought and the same approach can be applied to training. Thinking allows hesitation and when you hesitate you become unsure of yourself and your ability. The thought process belongs to the mind. Establishing value and following your conviction undeterred are solely elements of the mind which require preconceived rational thought.

Every animal has a brain and that animal responds to their environment re-actively. If its hungry it hunts and kills or begs to be fed. If its being hunted it runs from danger or stands its ground. Man, however, although an animal has the ability to use his mind and this elevates him above all life. The convictions and values you establish before your training will determine success on the platform or failure. If you do not succumb to doubt but hold to what is needed to achieve mastery in your discipline while at the same time train your brain to only react to the stress upon it, this is good.

If warming up is unnecessary to achieve maximum performance then how does a weightlifter achieve maximal weights in a short amount of time?

In order to accomplish this requires a mastery of your discipline. Until the body has been prepared through countless hours of repetition and the brain begins to behave solely by reacting and not thinking, then the mind of the weightlifter will never begin to develop the essential quality to reaching mastery. And what is that you say? Being without fear of course!

Through consistent disciplined training you not only began to see what your body is truly capable of but also how your mind conceives its immediate challenges. Only by abandoning fear can a weightlifter achieve maximal performance beyond what is thought to be possible. When he or she does this they elusively move into the exceptional.

How do I focus on increasing my adrenaline to perform when I need it?

This is difficult to do in training but is most always felt in competition. The body will adapt to the demands placed on it over time. Only by increasing those demands consciously will you increase your numbers (increasing numbers when it matters is all that matters.) The same process can be applied to the adrenaline producing gland in your brain. Thinking deters your improvement. Do not think for a moment that it would be better to save this burst of adrenaline in your training for a later training date. No, instead relinquish its powers all the time and instead learn how to replenish its value quickly. The more you focus on using your adrenaline daily then the larger this gland will become. Eventually this should be accomplished without thought. The weightlifter will perform consistently at higher intensities if this process is done constantly. In response to this process your performance will increase.

Explain why there is no better motivation than self-preservation, and why this extreme cannot be applied to training?

Because weightlifting will not at the end of the day kill you. Here is an analogy and how it can roughly translate to any thoughts of warming up. If your hiking in the woods and happen to come across a bear who has it in mind to have you for breakfast, your not going to tell that bear hold on while I stretch my hamstrings and do a couple hip swivels and jumping jacks. Your more than likely (unless your a coward) going to do an about face and run faster than you have ever ran before in order to hike another day, or just punch him in the face. After you make it to safety sure your going to be sore the next day but the idea is to continue placing that stress upon you. Maybe next time go on safari and piss off a herd of hippo’s.

This idea can be applied to warming up. You do not need to spend time preparing to lift, only lift. If you want to call starting with the bar warming up then call it whatever you want. I call it beginning your training.

In theory with this being said you should be able to roll right out of bed and lift maximum weights. Yes, you can if if you place your mind in the most extreme situation you can conceive and then react to the impetus in front of you.

My new friend Ruslev Khomenko, a Russian coach of Junior athletes, and I talked a fair amount about the Bulgarian system of training.  When I first brought this up, I expected him to dismiss it as inferior to how he trained athletes.  He did not do this, in fact he said it was a GREAT system, maybe the best.  The qualification was this, it is the best, IF IT WORKS FOR YOU!!!  In his opinion, it only works for some people…  and if you dont belong to this select group, you can still be a great lifter, you just have to try something else.  His best results were 135/160 at 62kg bodyweight, not good in his estimation, and the Bulgrian system hadnt worked for him.  According to him, some people get a real deterioration in technique when they train to max all the time, others, for whatever reason, get more and more effecient.  Some people thrive on frequent squatting, some simply dont.

This strikes me as a common sense attitude.  Do what works.  The Russians believe their “system” works for a wider variety of people, and doesnt produce as many injuries.  But they, or at least Ruslev, agrees that the Bulgarian system is the “ideal” for a person with no weak points.

All of this brings up another interesting observation.  There doesnt seem to be that much discussion among coaches from other countries about whos system is better or worse, who is right or wrong.  Based off of a weeks worth of conversation with coaches from multiple European and Asian countries,  it seems they agree on a few things.  One is that effecient technique needs to be taught.  Another is that a lifestyle has to be provided to the athlete and followed by the athlete that allows them to handle a high training load.  Another is that the athlete has to continue to follow the program, increase the workload and increase the weights.  Concerning training programs, I get the feeling that a lot of Europeans feel about the same way about this as Americans feel about the brand of shoes that a lifter wears.  Yes, everyone has a preference, but does anyone really think that the brand of shoes that one wears will determine whether he or she will become a champion or not?

I got the feeling over and over while talking to coaches who have a history of producing multiple Junior World champions, World Champions, and even Olympic medalists that we here in America are worried about the wrong things.  I got the feeling that we might better worry about sleep habits, eating habits, and various recovery methods than how often we go to maximum.  Of course, all this only after we worry about picking the right people to coach in the first place.  But I prefer to concentrate on what I can control.

This is not to say that how you train doesnt matter.  It shouldnt be hard for anyone to think of several training programs that would not work at all with little problem.  But the parameters that a successful program must exist within are well established,  and it is also well established that many different programs exist within these parameters.

What are these parameters?  Based on conversations with 8 of the male medalists and 3 of the female medalists at the 2010 Junior Worlds, as well as conversations with the Japanese, Korean, Russian,  and Turkish coaches, here is how the best are currently training.  The minimum training sessions per week that I encountered was 5, maximum 12.  Minimum hours spent training per week was about 8, maximum about 18.  I did not talk to the Chinese, who I dont doubt top this number.  Everyone snatches.  Everyone clean and jerks.  Everyone squats and front squats.  Everyone does power snatches and power cleans.  Most do pulls.  Many do some sort of pressing or push pressing.  This group of exercises makes up most of the work done.  Many have some sort of exercise which they do which isnt as widespread, some do jumping exercises, some bench press.  A few do some sort of good morning exercise or stiff legged deadlift variation.  Some do some variation of back raise, back extension, or Glute Ham raise.  In no instance which I encountered did these “extra” exercises make up any sigificant part of the training load.  No one does only singles.  No one does sets of 10.  Most use a variety of reps between 1 and 5.  Most do snatches and/or clean and jerks, or some close variation, every workout or almost every workout with significant weights.  The most interesting thing I encountered was a Russian coach from Chechnya who advocated lots of Kettlebell work for beginning lifters, including the throwing of the KB behind ones head.  He only advocated it as a warmup for lifters who are not beginners.

If the preceeding has closed one mystery, it has certainly opened another.  If the sets and reps, and time per week we go to maximum arent what is holding us back, then what is?  If we dont do enough pulls, or do too many…  if this is not the problem, then what is?  Well, I do not know if I know the answer or not.  But if the answer to that question is the same answer as to the question “what are the differences that I saw between us and the medalists?” then I have a few observations.

And that will be another post…

glenn

Based on our performance at the last few competitions,  training is going to change slightly.  What we as a team lack the most is consistency, and we are going to do a few things differently to address this.  The basic plan will stay as it was, but morning workouts will focus a little more on medium weights, with the emphasis being on consistent technique and no misses.  To make up for the decrease in intensity in morning workouts, we will add a little volume and even some assistance work, and we will try out some variety on how the competition lifts are performed on the morning workouts.